Colorlines

NOW IN RACIAL JUSTICE

Florida Man Tasered, Arrested for Walking While Black

Florida Man Tasered, Arrested for Walking While Black

Bobby Wingate is a black man who lives in Jacksonville, Florida who was only trying to get to an appointment when he was stopped by a local police officer, beaten, tasered, and arrested. A judge later dropped all charges against Wingate, but the police officer involved in the incident is still on the job and his department has not launched an internal investigation. Wingate says that he wants an apology from the officer, but adds: “If I ever see him again, and he needs my help for something, I’ll help him.”

(h/t Gawker)

New York City Says Goodbye to Its Oldest Taxi Driver

New York City Says Goodbye to Its Oldest Taxi Driver

When Johnnie “Spider” Footman moved to New York City from segregated Florida, his mother didn’t think he’d last in the Big Apple. “My mother told my uncle, ‘Take him away from here, because he’s going to get killed,’” Footman told the New York Post last year in an interview.  Not only did Footman make it in the city, but he also wound up becoming its longest tenured taxi driver. Footman picked up fares from 1945 until 2012 and, this week, he passed away at the age of 94. Before his death, Footman shared some of his most memorable stories. Check out the video above.

(h/t Gawker)

TAGS: Taxi

Immigrant Window Washer Documentary Shortlisted for an Academy Award

Immigrant Window Washer Documentary Shortlisted for an Academy Award

The Windy City is probably one of the most dangerous places to be a window washer. Taking a closer look at the workers who daily dangle down the city’s skyscrapers, Paraíso highlights a group of Mexican immigrants who have built their careers in this risky profession. 

In a New York Times op-ed published this week, filmmaker Nadav Kurtz says he was inspired to make the film when he watched a window washer at work from his desk in Chicago. 

This momentary interaction seemed a perfect metaphor for life in many multiethnic American cities where the work of immigrants often goes unnoticed. 

The film, which we highlighted as a top-10 Sundance pick earlier this year, was just shortlisted as an Academy Award nominee and screened at the Tribeca Film Festival. 

One Day in the Life of Sikh Captain America

One Day in the Life of Sikh Captain America

Meet Vishavjit Singh, an editorial cartoonist behind Sikhtoons, which chronicles the experiences of everyday Sikh Americans in the aftermath of 9/11. Inspired by one of his comics, Singh decided to spend one day roaming the streets of New York City and wrote about it for Salon:

People shook my hands, and a few literally congratulated me. The celebrity-of-the-moment experience was a little overwhelming. But I was jarred out of that trance by a few negative outliers. One man tried to grab my turban. Another yelled, “Captain Arab.” And yet another: “Terrorista!”

[snip]

It was the most unlikeliest of days for me. Hundreds of strangers came up to me. And we were able to lay to rest any anxieties or inhibitions in those moments — about other people, about the unknown, about ourselves, about violating other people’s personal spaces or not understanding their beliefs. We could simply meet. Say hi. Snap a memory of that moment. And I could leave brand-new images on the hard drive of their mind — as well as their hand-held devices, Apple clouds, virtual worlds.

You can read the rest of Singh’s tale over at Salon.

(h/t Angry Asian Man)

White Woman Becomes Maasai Warrior (Seriously)

White Woman Becomes Maasai Warrior (Seriously)

When Mindy Budgor was 27 years old, she apparently tried to find meaning in her life by temporarily ditching her wealth in Santa Barbara and jetting over to hang with the poor people of Kenya for two weeks on a humanitarian mission. While there, she says she met Maasai warriors and a chief named Winston who told her women were not allowed to be warriors. Budgor then returned home and hired a personal trainer to prepare her to return to Kenya to test the Maassai’s practice. According to Yahoo.com, Budgor says she was rejected by Winston, but then found someone else to help her meet her personal challenge:

After working with a personal trainer for six weeks in California to get in shape for her upcoming challenge, Budgor, along with a similarly adventurous friend, returned to Winston. He reneged on his offer, but the determined women found their way to a more open-minded warrior named Lanet, in Nairobi, who agreed to take them on. 

In an essay on The Guardian, Budgor claims that she was successful in her inexplicable drive to change a people she never had any connection with. On her website, which promotes the book she penned called “Warrior Princess: My Quest to Become the First Female Maasai Warrior,” the oddly beaded Budgor is described as answering a higher calling:

Mindy immediately realizes her calling and thus begins her amazing adventure to become the first female Maasai warrior. As a result of this training and advocacy, the Maasai in Loita, Kenya, are leading the charge to change tribal law and allow women the right to become Maasai warriors. Mindy as a tribe member is ready to return to stand with her fellow-warriors against whatever opposition they might face—be it lions, or elephants, or Western-influence.

There’s a very long and tragic history of white people acting as saviors, going abroad and wreaking absolute cultural, environmental, economic, and political havoc. There’s also a very troubling history of white people misappropriating customs and robes that do not belong to them. Budgor seems to be comfortable repeating these practices and then some.

The fact that Budgor recognizes tribal law but feels comfortable challenging it—while claiming she is helping “her fellow-warriors against […] Western-influence”—is disturbing, least of all for the contradiction her practice contains. Perhaps more disturbing is that Budgor regards herself “as a tribe member” after spending several weeks in Nairobi on a self-styled safari and returning to her actual home in the U.S. Budgor seems to be behaving less like a Maasai warrior and more like a white woman writing a book to turn a profit from her romanticized trip to Kenya.  

Shonda Rhimes to Produce New Show with Scandal’s Dan Bucatinsky

Shonda Rhimes to Produce New Show with Scandal's Dan Bucatinsky

“Scandal” fans, Shonda Rhimes has something new cooking. She’s collaborating with Dan Bucatinsky, who plays Cyrus Black’s husband James on the show, in a new series inspired by his recently published book “Does This Baby Make Me Look Straight.” The new series, called “Show & Tell,” will be a hour-long dramedy about the also scandalous lives of parents, including (from the sounds of Bucatinsky’s book) gay parents, whose children all go to the same school.

TV Host Julie Chen Says She Was Pressured Into Eyelid Surgery

TV Host Julie Chen Says She Was Pressured Into Eyelid Surgery

Julie Chen, the host of CBS’ “The Talk”, recently revealed that she had eyelid surgery to appear “less Asian.” At the urging of an agent, and after feeling pressure inside of local television newsrooms to appear more relatable, Chen got plastic surgery. As she tells the story:

“My secret dates back to - my heart is racing - it dates back to when I was 25 years old and I was working as a local news reporter in Dayton, Ohio,” Julie began.

She then set the scene by showing a clip of what a young Julie Chen looked like as a reporter at one of her first jobs and explaining how it was her dream to be a network news anchor some day.

“So, I asked my news director… over the holidays if anchors want to take vacations, could I fill in? And he said, ‘You will never be on this anchor desk, because you’re Chinese.’ He said ‘Let’s face it Julie, how relatable are you to our community? How big of an Asian community do we have in Dayton? On top of that because of your Asian eyes, I’ve noticed that when you’re on camera, you look disinterested and bored.’

“So, what am I supposed to say to my boss? I wanted to cry right then and there. It felt like a dagger in my heart, because all of my life I wanted to be a network anchor,” she continued.

(h/t Angry Asian Man)

Watch 100 Women Risk Arrest for Immigration Reform

Watch 100 Women Risk Arrest for Immigration Reform

With Congress back in session this week, 100 women—several among them undocumented—participated in an act of civil disobedience in front of the House of Representatives today. Organized by the We Belong Together initiative, the women came together to highlight the undue burden faced by women in the struggle for immigration reform. 

Four undocumented women joined the demonstration today, risking arrest and subsequent deportation to advocate for immigration reform. These women were joined by directors and representatives from organizations including the National Domestic Workers Alliance, CHIRLA, NOW, UltraViolet, America’s Voice, The Black Institute, 9 to 5 Working Women, the Tennessee State Conference of NAACP, and many others.

With an incredibly short amount of time left this year to deal with a host of issues, Congress is unlikely to pass the much contested immigration bill. Yet activists have continued to participate in actions such as today’s protest to highlight the struggle of the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S. who have been told —yet again—they must wait for reform. 

Naming the Shame Surrounding Trans Women

Naming the Shame Surrounding Trans Women

If Mr. Cee’s resignation has proven anything, it’s that many of us continue to base our conversations about trans women on a sense of shame and secrecy—and a troubling, unnecessary urge to pathologize certain attractions. As writer and activist Janet Mock points out in a critical essay today, the conversation about Mr. Cee isn’t one about “soliciting sex from someone he perceived as a trans woman;” it’s about a pervading ideology that questions the mere existence of trans women:

The shame that society attaches to these men, specifically attacking their sexuality and shaming their attraction, directly affects trans women. It affects the way we look at ourselves. It amplifies our body-image issues, our self-esteem, our sense of possibility, of daring for greatness, of aiming for something or somewhere greater. If a young trans woman believes that the only way she can share intimate space with a man is through secret hookups, bootycalls or transaction, she will be led to engage in risky sexual behaviors that make her more vulnerable to criminalization, disease and violence; she will be led to coddle a man who takes out his frustrations about his sexuality on her with his fists; she will be led to question whether she’s worthy enough to protect herself with a condom when a man tells her he loves her; she will be led to believe that she is not worthy of being seen, that being seen heightens her risk of violence therefore she must hide who she is at all costs in order to survive.

You can read Mock’s full post, titled How Society Shames Men Dating Trans Women & How This Affects Our Lives, over on her site, janetmock.com

Legendary DJ Mister Cee Grapples with Homophobia in Hip-Hop

Legendary DJ Mister Cee Grapples with Homophobia in Hip-Hop

Yesterday the legendary hip-hop DJ Mister Cee resigned from his 20-year post at New York City’s Hot 97 after a male video blogger named Bimbo Winehouse released audio of a man who sounds like the DJ soliciting sex for money. Born Calvin LeBrun, Mister Cee had been arrested previously for soliciting sex from transgender prostitutes. 

This morning Mister Cee, who is most famous for DJing for Big Daddy Kane and serving as an associate executive producer on Notorious B.I.G.’s debut, “Ready to Die,” did a revealing interview with Hot 97 programming director Ebro Darden about sexuality, shame and homophobia in hip-hop. Throughout the interview, Darden invites the DJ to return to his job and reassures him that the station accepts him as he is. At times tearful, Mister Cee says that he’s tired of hiding his desires. The exchange is worth a listen.   

Cam Newton Handles Questions About Race at NFL Press Conference

Cam Newton Handles Questions About Race at NFL Press Conference

Despite the fact there are nine black or biracial starting quarterbacks in the NFL these days, there are still lingering questions about whether black men can withstand what is arguably football’s toughest position. 

Carolina Panthers’ third-yard QB Cam Newton addressed some of those questions in a recent press conference. 

“I don’t think race hinders anybody at this position,” Newton said. “Opportunities are opportunities, whether you are African American, Chinese, Japanese, Caucasian. If you got skills to play this particular game of football, then you’re going to play, no matter what your race. For me, my opportunity presented itself, me going through Auburn, and it’s just that. I didn’t feel any type of pressure coming into this league saying that I have to represent all African-Americans, outside of saying all my fans are just African-Americans. When I play this game, I play it to the best of my ability, so I can inspire everyone, not just a particular set of people.”

Later, he added:

“Absolutely not,” Newton said. “You don’t have a Bat Mitzvah just because you’re starting African-American quarterbacks in this league, even though I’m fans of everybody. I can’t just say I root for Michael Vick, RGII, Russell Wilson, Colin Kaepernick and those guys. I still feel as if I learn more, or just as much, from Michael Vick as I do from a Tom Brady or Aaron Rodgers, or even a RGIII.”

(h/t Yahoo! Sports)

TAGS: Cam Newton NFL

Watch Tyrone Williams BMX This Citi Bike

Watch Tyrone Williams BMX This Citi Bike

Bet you didn’t think Citi Bikes could pull bunnyhops to abubacas, huh? Animal put Dah Shop’s Tyrone Williams up to the task, and he shines. 

University of Alabama Sororities Bar Black Pledges

University of Alabama Sororities Bar Black Pledges

Two University of Alabama sorority members have come forward to confirm what many already know: sororities are blocking black women from pledging. While a some sorority sisters chose to remains anonymous, Alpha Gamma Delta’s Melanie Gotz spoke with her school’s newspaper on the record, describing how alumnae bar black candidates: 

“Are we really not going to talk about the black girl?”

The question - asked by Alpha Gamma Delta member Melanie Gotz during her chapter’s sorority recruitment - was greeted by silence. The sorority’s active members and a few alumnae gathered in the room to hear the unexpected news that there would be no voting on potential new members that night. The chapter, they were told, had already agreed on which students would be invited back for the next round.

And it’s not just alumnae that are blocking black pledges. Some sororities have a voting system—but black women are still kept from pledging:

“Not a lot of rushees get awesome scores,” the Tri Delta member said. “Sometimes sisters [of active members] don’t get that. [She] got excellent scores. The only thing that kept her back was the color of her skin in Tri Delt. She would have been a dog fight between all the sororities if she were white.”

And a Chi Omega sister said a University of Alabama employee named Emily Jamison kept a promising black recruit from being considered:

“I know [the recruit] got perfect scores from the people in chapter the first day, and she got cut after the first day and I know it had to do with our advisor - is the one that dropped her,” the Chi Omega member said. “Her name is Emily Jamison.”

The University of Alabama is no stranger to segregation. Governor George Wallace made his now infamous “segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever” statement there fifty years ago in 1963. Although Wallace’s attempt to block black students from entering the university’s doors was thwarted, it seems he had a point about segregation sticking around for a while.

You can read the entire investigative story over at The Crimson White site. 

(h/t al.com)

Public Universities Funding Less Low-Income Students Nationwide

Public Universities Funding Less Low-Income Students Nationwide

A new report shows that public universities are syphoning money away from grants for low-income students towards higher income students. These findings come from ProPublica and The Chronicle for Higher Education, which teamed up on the investigation. 

Based partly on the U.S. Department of Education National Postsecondary Student Aid Study, the gap has almost closed between aid given to low vs high income students over the past 6 years, which means both pools are receiving almost equal funding. The investigators also found that financial aid is increasingly being given instead on the basis of athletics, merit, international students, and study abroad at various schools.  And according to the report, this trend signals an effort on behalf of public universities to draw in wealthier, out-of-state students, to the detriment of those who most need aid.  

The article, which focuses heavily on public universities in Pennsylvania through the lens of one student, comes amid recent reports that the Philadelphia public school system is in serious financial trouble

(h/t ProPublica

Jasmine Jordan Responds to Gay Rumors

Jasmine Jordan Responds to Gay Rumors

Last week, rumors surfaced that Michael Jordan’s daughter, Jasmine Jordan, is in a relationship with former Syracuse University basketball player Carmen Tyson-Thomas. The rumors were sparked by a photo of the two together on Instagram

In Jordan’s response, she doesn’t come out either way, but she does have something lovely to say:

“Until love, trust, honesty, respect, loyalty, commitment, genuine happiness and other characteristics or aspects I want in a relationship is defined by one gender then and only then will I discuss my sexual preference.”

(h/t HuffPo Gay Voices”)

12 Years Later: A Post-9/11 Timeline

12 Years Later: A Post-9/11 Timeline

It’s been a long twelve years since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. In order to commemorate the anniversary, South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT) has put together a post-9/11 timeline that represents the key events in the wake of the attacks. The timeline is particularly focused on the impact of the attacks on South Asian communities, specifically Sikhs and Muslims. To see the timeline, visit SAALT’s website

Not All Immigrants Like the Senate’s Immigration Bill

Not All Immigrants Like the Senate's Immigration Bill

It remains unlikely that a comprehensive immigration reform bill will work its way through the House this term. Aside from Obama’s media tour for a strike against Syria and a looming debt ceiling deadline that threatens to shut down the government next month (that may hold healthcare hostage as a result), immigration has largely fallen to last place. If anything, rather than build on the Senate’s comprehensive bill, the House will work on piecemeal legislation. 

But while the Senate’s bill has been touted by some advocates as the best option moving forward, it doesn’t actually guarantee a pathway to citizenship for the approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. It would, however, increase criminalization. Abraham Paulos, who heads Families for Freedom, explains: 

Among our biggest concerns is that S. 744 systematically binds a criminal legal system rooted in mass imprisonment with an immigration system driven by enforcement. Along with the current push for enforcement, the criminalization of our immigrant communities will continue to grow in order to justify the billions of dollars being pumped into immigration enforcement.

Read Paulos’s entire post about why Families for Freedom rejects the bill over at Huffington Post. 

There’s a Documentary About Sonia Sanchez in the Works

There's a Documentary About Sonia Sanchez in the Works

For over four decades, Sonia Sanchez has written, taught, and mentored her way to the forefront of contemporary black arts in America. Now there’s an effort to make a film about her life’s work. The 79-year-old poet is the focus of a new Kickstarter campaign for a documentary titled “BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez” by Barbara Attir, Janet Goldwater, and Sabrina Schmidt Gordon. The goal is to raise $55,000, and the title comes from Sanchez’s second book of poetry, “We a BaddDDD People.”

 

Muslim Woman Wins Hijab Suit Against Abercrombie and Fitch

Muslim Woman Wins Hijab Suit Against Abercrombie and Fitch

A federal judge ruled earlier this week that Abercrombie and Fitch violated federal anti-discrimination employment guidelines when it fired an employee who refused to remove her hijab while working at the store. Umme-Hani Khan first brought the suit in 2011 after being fired from her job at Hollister, a subsidiary of Abercrombie & Fitch, in Northern California. “When I was asked to remove my scarf after being hired with it on, I was demoralized and felt unwanted,” Khan told the San Mateo County Times that year.

Following the ruling, Khan’s supporters emphasized the importance of this case. “All Americans have a right to reasonable religious accommodation in the workplace, and for Muslim women this includes the right to wear a hijab to work,” Zahra Billoo, executive director of the San Francisco Bay Area chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (which filed the suit) told the Washington Post.

Meet the Team Behind the 2pac, Eazy-E, Ol’ Dirty Bastard Holograms

Meet the Team Behind the 2pac, Eazy-E, Ol' Dirty Bastard Holograms

First, there was 2pac’s performance at last year’s Coachella Music Festival in Southern California. Then came this year’s Rock the Bells concert in Los Angeles, which brought us guest appearances from Eazy-E and Ol’ Dirty Bastard.  How exactly have these long-deceased rappers managed to re-introduce themselves to the world? Thanks, in large part, to the work of hologram creators AV concepts and Chris Romero.

Here’s ODB’s recent performance at Rock the Bells (skip ahead to 2:08):

And here’s Eazy-E’s performance with Bone Thugz-N-Harmony (Skip ahead to 39 seconds):

MTV News caught up with Romero:

For Romero however, the journey started in 2001 when he was tasked with animating the late Big Pun for his posthumous “How We Roll” music video for his posthumous Endangered Species LP. “In 2001 I was sitting with Fat Joe in the back on an Italian restaurant… it was kind of the same types of conversations I have now with Eazy-E and Dirty’s family,” Romero told MTV News. “They have the same concerns that Fat Joe and Big Pun’s people had with his legacy 12 years ago. I carry that reputation and that desire to keep extending the legacies for artists who aren’t here.”

[snip]

Romero and his team even hooked up with AV Concepts, the same minds behind the eye-popping ‘Pac stunt. “AV Concepts are actually the guys that did the execution of the avatar from a technology and set-up stand point,” he said. “My job is to recreate that feeling as good as possible and even a little bit larger than life.”

To recreate that feeling, Romero and a team of about 15 different people used a myriad of different reanimation techniques and even some motion capturing. “With Eazy-E, I actually worked with all of his kids,” he revealed. “One of his kids helped with the voice of Eazy-E talking to the crowd, one of his kids did his actual body movements and one of his kids did his facial movements.”

“We’re nothing short of magicians,” Romero says at the end of the profile, which you can read in full over at MTV News

* This story has been updated since publication.

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