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Muslim Woman Wins Hijab Suit Against Abercrombie and Fitch

Muslim Woman Wins Hijab Suit Against Abercrombie and Fitch

A federal judge ruled earlier this week that Abercrombie and Fitch violated federal anti-discrimination employment guidelines when it fired an employee who refused to remove her hijab while working at the store. Umme-Hani Khan first brought the suit in 2011 after being fired from her job at Hollister, a subsidiary of Abercrombie & Fitch, in Northern California. “When I was asked to remove my scarf after being hired with it on, I was demoralized and felt unwanted,” Khan told the San Mateo County Times that year.

Following the ruling, Khan’s supporters emphasized the importance of this case. “All Americans have a right to reasonable religious accommodation in the workplace, and for Muslim women this includes the right to wear a hijab to work,” Zahra Billoo, executive director of the San Francisco Bay Area chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (which filed the suit) told the Washington Post.

Meet the Team Behind the 2pac, Eazy-E, Ol’ Dirty Bastard Holograms

Meet the Team Behind the 2pac, Eazy-E, Ol' Dirty Bastard Holograms

First, there was 2pac’s performance at last year’s Coachella Music Festival in Southern California. Then came this year’s Rock the Bells concert in Los Angeles, which brought us guest appearances from Eazy-E and Ol’ Dirty Bastard.  How exactly have these long-deceased rappers managed to re-introduce themselves to the world? Thanks, in large part, to the work of hologram creators AV concepts and Chris Romero.

Here’s ODB’s recent performance at Rock the Bells (skip ahead to 2:08):

And here’s Eazy-E’s performance with Bone Thugz-N-Harmony (Skip ahead to 39 seconds):

MTV News caught up with Romero:

For Romero however, the journey started in 2001 when he was tasked with animating the late Big Pun for his posthumous “How We Roll” music video for his posthumous Endangered Species LP. “In 2001 I was sitting with Fat Joe in the back on an Italian restaurant… it was kind of the same types of conversations I have now with Eazy-E and Dirty’s family,” Romero told MTV News. “They have the same concerns that Fat Joe and Big Pun’s people had with his legacy 12 years ago. I carry that reputation and that desire to keep extending the legacies for artists who aren’t here.”

[snip]

Romero and his team even hooked up with AV Concepts, the same minds behind the eye-popping ‘Pac stunt. “AV Concepts are actually the guys that did the execution of the avatar from a technology and set-up stand point,” he said. “My job is to recreate that feeling as good as possible and even a little bit larger than life.”

To recreate that feeling, Romero and a team of about 15 different people used a myriad of different reanimation techniques and even some motion capturing. “With Eazy-E, I actually worked with all of his kids,” he revealed. “One of his kids helped with the voice of Eazy-E talking to the crowd, one of his kids did his actual body movements and one of his kids did his facial movements.”

“We’re nothing short of magicians,” Romero says at the end of the profile, which you can read in full over at MTV News

* This story has been updated since publication.

Movie-Goers Find Violence in ‘12 Years a Slave’ Too Intense, Walk Out

Movie-Goers Find Violence in '12 Years a Slave' Too Intense, Walk Out

Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave” has been getting rave reviews for its realistic portrayal of the horror of slavery. But for fans in Toronto, where the film is screening at the city’s annual film festival, the violence was too much to take. 

From the International Business Times:

The movie focuses on the story of Ejiofor, who plays Northup - a free musician living in Saratoga, New York, who is kidnapped and sold into slavery in the South.

An early scene shows him being beaten 15 times with a bat and then whipped 14 times by his kidnappers.

The director McQueen also shows slaves being hanged and killed. One scene, lasting 10 minutes, shows a plantation owner, played by Michael Fassbender, stringing up a slave to a post before ordering her beating. She is whipped at total of 41 times.

The film eventually recieved a standing ovation, but not before several audience members walked out, according to the Business Times. So far, it’s drawing comparisons with “Schiendler’s List.”

Oklahoma School Changes Policy on Dreadlocks

Oklahoma School Changes Policy on Dreadlocks

A Tulsa, Oklahoma charter school has amended a 14-year-old policy barring students from wearing “distracting” or “faddish” hairstyles such as dreadlocks and mohawks. The decision came after news broke that 7-year-old Tiana Parker, a student at Deborah Brown Community School, had been repeatedly reprimanded for wearing dreadlocks to school. In a tearful interview, Tiana says she’s sad because the school “didn’t like her dreads.”

Her father Terrance Parker, who is a barber and says he always takes pride in his daughter’s hairstyles, decided to enroll Tiana in a different school. But over the last week the story got nationwide attention, which forced the school to revisit their policies around appropriate hairstyles. Melissa Harris-Perry of MSNBC was among those who spoke out on Tiana’s behalf last week, with this delightful video letter:

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Apple’s New iPhones and the Race to Drive Smartphone Adoption

Apple's New iPhones and the Race to Drive Smartphone Adoption

Apple has announced the release of its new iPhone 5C and iPhone 5S. It’s a significant moment, as most Apple product announcements are, because the company’s innvoations have so often shaped the landscape of consumer products over the past decade. It’s also an important moment to take a look at how race colors that landscape.

The new iPhone 5C is a lower cost device that Apple hopes will help them compete against its more affordable rivals, particularly Samsung. It features all the functionality of a traditional iPhone wrapped inside of a colorful plastic case, according to the Chicago Tribune. The device comes at a crucial time for the company as millions of people in the U.S. and abroad have adopted smartphones. “With smartphones surpassing 125 million U.S. consumers and tablets now owned by more than 50 million, we have crossed into the Brave New Digital World — a new paradigm of digital media fragmentation in which consumers are ways connected,” according to a report released earlier this year by comScore, an industry analytics company.

But just how we’re connected often has a lot to do with race. Another report released earlier this year by Pew noted that Latino 86 percent of Latinos own a cell phone, compared with 84 percent of whites and 90 percent of blacks. And Latinos are just as likely as blacks and whites to own a smartphone: 49 percent.  

But that same research pointed out just how reliant Latino users are on their smartphones as their primary devices to get online. Latino users were more likely than whites to say that they use smartphones to go online, and equally likely to access the internet from a mobile decive. That means that since smartphones are often easier and cheaper to use than high-speed home internet access, there are still lingering effects of the digital divide, primarly between those who can consume content and those who can create it.

Magic Johnson Talks About How His Gay Son Fits Into MLK’s Dream

Magic Johnson Talks About How His Gay Son Fits Into MLK's Dream

Magic Johnson is clear about what he thinks is most important in the black community: jobs. The NBA legend talked to The Grio’s Chris Witherspoon about advancing Martin Luther King Jr’s dream of racial equality, and was clear to point out that the LGBT community has an important stake in that fight. To bring that point home, Johnson talked about how he and his wife Cookie have supported their son, EJ, who came out publicly. “My son EJ came out, me and my wife Cookie are happy to support him a million percent,” Johnson told The Grio, adding later, “I don’t care about the backlash. If somebody don’t agree, that’s on them.”

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Chris Rock and W. Kamau Bell On What’s So Funny About Race

Chris Rock and W. Kamau Bell On What's So Funny About Race

Black comedians Chris Rock and W. Kamau Bell sat down for an interview with The Root recently to talk about how they inject smart cultural criticism in their work. Rock is an executive producer for Bell’s hit FX show “Totally Biased”, which has been tackling everything from Stop-and-Frisk to the n-word. Here’s a gist of the interview, in which they about how humor can be an effective platform for discussions about racial inequity:

WKB: So many white people in America can understand race simply by quoting Chris Rock or Bill Cosby. That just goes to show how powerful comedy can be. It helps people see through the eyes of others without the fear of misunderstanding. Laughter is a great equalizer that way. It brings us closer together, without us even realizing it.

Read the rest over at The Root.

Watch White People React Angrily to the Word ‘Hipster’

Watch White People React Angrily to the Word 'Hipster'

What’s the worst thing you can call a white person these days? Apparently, it’s a “hipster.” Watch this funny sketch from writer Kristina Wong.

(h/t Angry Asian Man)

Janelle Monáe Performs New Song on David Letterman’s Desk

Janelle Monáe Performs New Song on David Letterman's Desk

In order to celebrate the release of her second album, “The Electric Lady,” Janelle Monáe turned David Letterman’s desk into a stage and performed her new song, “Dance Apocalyptic.” For more on the album itself, check out this morning’s feature: Janelle Monáe: Cyborg Diva, Black Girl Nerd, Marketing Genius

Update: George Zimmerman Released Without Charges

Update: George Zimmerman Released Without Charges

We reported yesterday that George Zimmerman was in “investigative custody” based on a 911 call placed by his wife, Shellie. She accused Zimmerman of punching her father in the nose and threatening them both with a gun, saying in the 911 call that she was afraid Zimmerman was going to shoot them. 

He has since been released from custody, and his wife has retracted her statements, saying she didn’t actually see a gun. Neither she nor her father are pressing charges against ZImmerman. His lawyer Mark O’Mara told reporters he believed the incident was a case of heightened emotions typical of divorce proceedings, also saying “There may have been some pushing and touching. That happens a lot in divorce situations …” O’Mara also said it was likely Zimmerman was armed, but that he never drew his weapon. 

George Zimmerman Detained After Gun-Related Domestic Incident

George Zimmerman Detained After Gun-Related Domestic Incident

George Zimmerman is currently in “investigative custody” with Florida police in connection with a domestic battery charge involving his wife, Shellie. He is not under arrest nor has he been formally charged, but police in Lake Mary, Fla., are holding him at a relative’s house after his wife called 911, claiming Zimmerman had threatened her. Allegedly, he pulled a knife on her during an altercation, and then pulled a gun on her and her father. Shellie Zimmerman filed for divorce last week.  

Zimmerman, who was found not guilty for the murder of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in July, has remained in the spotlight this summer. In August he was photographed taking a tour of a Florida gun manufacturer, and has been pulled over for speeding twice.

This story is still developing. Stay tuned.

East Harlem Mural Sparks Controversy in Local Election

East Harlem Mural Sparks Controversy in Local Election

The battle for the next Mayor of New York has dominated the conversation ahead Tuesday’s Primary Election in New York City. Between Anthony Weiner’s sexting and arguing with voters, and Bill de Blasio’s son Dante’s impressive Afro, smaller elections aren’t getting much attention. 

But in East Harlem, a recent mural project has sparked controversy among two City Council candidates. Candidate Gwen Goodwin claims that incumbent Melissa Mark-Viverito conspired against her campaign by coordinating a mural on her building. According to the New York Daily News, she told supporters : 

“This a picture of a bird who’s head has been severed from its body,” she wrote in a mass email to supporters. “I have been told in the Puerto Rican culture it means ‘problem solved.’”

Goodwin claimed the painting has connections to Santeria, a mix of ancient African rituals with voodoo and some Catholicism. 

The mural is part Los Muros Hablan, a project coordinated by La Respuesta in partnership with El Museo del Barrio, which was supported by Council Member Melissa Mark-Viverito.

(h/t New York Daily News)

Undocumented Immigrant Awaits Supreme Court Decision on Becoming a Lawyer

Undocumented Immigrant Awaits Supreme Court Decision on Becoming a Lawyer

Sergio C. Garcia is fighting the California Supreme Court for the right to practice law in that state. In 2009 he passed the California State Bar exam (on the first try), and soon after was sworn in, admitted, and licensed to practice law in CA. But, according to Coalition for Humane Rights of Immigrants of Los Angeles (CHIRLA), who is advocating on his behalf, his license was revoked two weeks later based on “an error.” 

The State Bar Association of California and the CA Department of Justice both support Garcia’s case. Last week the CA Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case, and will ultimately make a landmark decision on whether a professional license, such as that to practice law, should be denied on the basis of citizenship. 

Melissa Lambarena, spokesperson advocating for Garcia, says he will now wait 90 days to learn the CA Supreme Court’s decision. “In the meantime he is reaching out to the legislature and has received their support. If the decision from the court is not in Sergio’s favor he is determined to target the U.S. Supreme Court,” she says.

Garcia is an undocumented immigrant who was brought to the U.S. by his parents when he was a year old. He left the U.S. temporarily at age 9, but came back into the country at age 17 and has been in CA ever since. Garcia has a pending green card application, which was filed in 1994 and was accepted in 1995, but still hasn’t come through. 

Marimacho Plays With Gender at New York Fashion Week

Marimacho Plays With Gender at New York Fashion Week

We covered Marimacho’s gender bending back in June as part of our annual pride package. The Brooklyn-based indie line also did it big at this year’s Fashion Week. Proof:

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Eagles Fan Makes the Best Case for a Washington Redskins Name Change

Eagles Fan Makes the Best Case for a Washington Redskins Name Change

Philadelphia takes on Washington, DC this evening in Monday Night Football and, in all likelihood, a (fake) severed head wearing a (presumably) Indian head dress will be there.

‘Merika, y’all. 

(h/t Native Appropriations)

TAGS: NFL Redskins RG3

Parting Words From Resigning NAACP President Ben Jealous

Parting Words From Resigning NAACP President Ben Jealous

“We gotta stay focused on passing laws to expand the vote wherever we can, and to roll back voter suppression laws wherever we can and stay focused on that until the job is done,” said NAACP President Ben Jealous when I interviewed him a couple of weeks ago at the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington ceremony at the Lincoln Memorial. 

That job is far from done, but Jealous will be working it from a different angle come 2014. Yesterday, Krissah Thompson at The Washington Post broke the news that Jealous plans to resign from the 104-year-old civil rights organization at the end of this year. After five years at the NAACP’s helm — and just one year into a recently renewed three-year contract — Jealous is choosing to devote time to his 13-month-old son and 7-year-old daughter, he told Thompson. He’s also venturing into more partisan pastures, getting involved in efforts to help launch progressive candidates into government, particularly in the South, as reported by USA Today.

Roslyn M. Brock, NAACP’s chairman of the organization’s board of director’s said of the announcement:

“We thank President Jealous for his time leading the Association. Under his leadership, the NAACP has built a highly competent staff that will carry our mission forward and meet the civil rights challenges of the 21st century. Our board, staff and volunteer leaders throughout the country deeply appreciate his sacrifice, and will continue to implement our game-changing goals for the next half century that include the restoration of Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, implementing Trayvon’s Law, bolstering civic engagement efforts and ensuring our community is enrolled in the Affordable Care Act exchanges.”

Sherrilyn Ifil, president of NAACP Legal and Educational Defense Fund, the litigation-focused organization founded by pioneering civil rights attorney Thurgood Marshall (no connection to NAACP except in name), said they “applaud the leadership” of Jealous. 

“Although the LDF and the NAACP have been separate organizations for over 50 years, LDF and its director-counsels have always enjoyed a close collaborative relationship with the NAACP,” said Ifill. “We have been particularly happy to work with Ben Jealous, who has brought energy, strategic vision and tireless advocacy to his work as the NAACP President. …Jealous leaves his organization with a strong legacy of coalition building and voter mobilization. His efforts have strengthened the entire civil rights community. We look forward to continuing to work with the NAACP, in particular this year as we intensify our efforts to protect minority voting rights in light of the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Shelby County, Ala. v. Holder.”

LDF experienced a departure of a civil rights pillar of their own when one of their leading attorneys Debo Adegbile transitioned in May to join the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee as their special counsel attorney. With the Senate committee, Adegbile will continue the Voting Rights Act protection work he performed with LDF — he delivered oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court in defense of VRA in the Shelby v. Holder proceedings — by helping Congress produce a solution for the Section 4 coverage formula. 

As for Jealous, he was also front and center for many of the voting rights battles fought concerning the Voting Rights Act, particularly as the U.S. Supreme Court partially dismantled it this summer. Jealous was also present for voting rights battles beyond the Supreme Court.

In Pennsylvania, where the NAACP continues to fight a photo voter ID law on racial disenfranchisement terms, Jealous told Colorlines at a court hearing on the matter before the November elections: “If the Pennsylvania Republican leadership succeeds in stealing this election by denying people the right to vote there will be hell to pay.” 

The Republican leadership did not succeed, despite their verbal confirmation that they were in fact trying to swipe votes from Obama via the voter ID law. 

When I interviewed Jealous at the 50th anniversary ceremony of the 1963 March on Washington, he emphasized the importance of restoring the Voting Rights Act to its fullest complement. He said he was “confident that Congress will restore Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act within the next 12 months, possibly by the end of this year.”

But he also warned those concerned about voter ID laws not to take eyes off of Pennsylvania, saying that “What they couldn’t do last year, they’re trying to do for 2016.” 

As for Pennsylvania Republicans confession that they were trying to rob Democratic votes, Jealous said, “the very notion that the [Republican] party in that state’s legislature would decide to suppress the votes of his neighbors to try to steal the presidential election was outrageous.”

Many of Jealous’s contemporaries are pushing for a constitutional amendment that would guarantee every American the right to vote, which while not an official campaign of the NAACP, is still “a very worthy cause,” said Jealous at the ceremony.

Standing with thousands of people gathered behind him that day on the National Mall and President Obama not far away seated at the Lincoln Memorial, Jealous said through wind and rain: “We must be vigilant, we must be organized, and we must stand up and recognize that our right to vote is paramount for our ability to defend all of our other rights.”  

Hear Jealous talk about the importance of working with environmental groups in restoring voting rights in this video clip of our interview here:

Ben Jealous from Be Mock on Vimeo.

[Update 1:50 p.m. 9/9/13] More on Jealous’s resgination announcement from the Sierra Club:

“Just a few weeks ago in Washington, civil rights activists marched with environmentalists, union workers, LGBT advocates, and thousands of Americans pushing our nation to fulfill its promise of justice and equality. It was a clear example of the unprecedented alliance of diverse voices and the strength of the civil rights movement of today that would not have been possible without the visionary leadership of Ben Jealous at the NAACP.

Recognizing that justice is not complete when American families don’t have access to clean air and clean water, Ben was instrumental in launching the NAACP’s environmental justice program. And driven by the understanding that the pursuit of justice means protecting workers, our planet, and our democracy, Ben and the NAACP were key in the formation of the Democracy Initiative alongside the Sierra Club, Greenpeace, and the Communications Workers of America. We have built new relationships, cultivated new strategies, and built new bridges that will move us forward together for years to come.

During Ben’s five years of service, the NAACP has not just added more members and registered more voters — it has courageously built alliances that have strengthened the organization’s cause and bolstered all of us in the struggle to secure a better future for every American. On behalf of the Sierra Club’s 2.1 million members and supporters, we congratulate Ben Jealous on a job well done and we look forward to working closely with his successor to continue building on the foundation he helped construct.”

Edwidge Danticat on the Dilemma of the Immigrant Writer

Edwidge Danticat on the Dilemma of the Immigrant Writer

Edwidge Danticat recently sat down to talk with Guernica Magazine about her new novel, “Claire of the Sea Light.” It’s Danticat’s first novel in more than a decade, and the first book she’s published since Haiti’s devestating 2010 earthquake. It’s a fascinating interview that touhces on everything from Danticat’s own creative process to how immigrant writers are categorized by publishers and Wikipedia. Here’s one part that really stood out:

Guernica: Would these be very different stories if you didn’t translate? If you took them down in Creole?

Edwidge Danticat: Oh, definitely. I had that experience with Krik? Krak! I made some of the stories into radio plays in Creole and they become totally different. More alive in some way. More immediate. In the epigraph to Drown, Junot Diaz uses a quote from a Cuban poet, Gustavo Pérez Firmat—“The fact that I am writing to you in English already falsifies what I wanted to tell you.” This is the dilemma of the immigrant writer. If I’d lived in Haiti my whole life, I’d be writing these things in Creole. But these stories I am writing now are coming through me as a person who, though I travel to Haiti often, has lived in the U.S. for more than three decades now.

Often when you’re an immigrant writing in English, people think it’s primarily a commercial choice. But for many of us, it’s a choice that rises out of the circumstances of our lives. These are the tools I have at my disposal, based on my experiences. It’s a constant debate, not just in my community but in other communities as well. Where do you belong? You’re kind of one of us, but you now write in a different language. You’re told you don’t belong to American literature or you’re told you don’t belong to Haitian literature. Maybe there’s a place on the hyphen, as Julia Alvarez so brilliantly wrote in one of her essays. That middle generation, the people whose parents brought them to other countries as small children, or even people who were born to immigrant parents, maybe they can have their own literature too.

Read the rest over at Guernica.



Asian American Students Still Face Bullying in New York City Schools

Asian American Students Still Face Bullying in New York City Schools

Back in 2008, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former Schools Chancellor Joel Klein announced an ambitious new initiative to try to help curb bullying in the Big Apple’s classrooms. The plan included putting up “Respect for All” posters in school buildings, documenting reported incidents of bullying, notifying parents, and following up with students after they had reported harrassment. The plan was applauded by some of the city’s Asian American non-profit groups who had long pushed for measures to end bullying in classrooms.

But a follow up survey released this month by the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund shows that there is significant work left to be done. In a snapshot survey of 163 Asian American students conducted in after school programs, youth leadership meetings, and houses of worship, researchers found that key components of the 2008 plan had yet to be fully implemented. Only 16 percent of survey respondents who reported bullying to their schools recieved a written report from their school, as mandated by the ‘08 plan. Additionally, only 0.5 percent of bullying victims surveyed reported that their parents were notified of their harrassment — another major requirement of the 2008 initiative. Overall, the survey found that reported incidents of bullying had actually increased 20 percent among Asian American students since a similar survey was conducted in 2009.

The survey’s authors are now pushing for the Department of Education (DOE) to publish yearly data on bullying and harrassment, along with increased training for school staff members on how to respond to bullying incidents and the implementation of resorative justice curriculum that emphasizes empathy instead of focusuing on punitive measures for students who engage in bullying behaviors.




Study Finds Growing Racial Divide Among Young People on Immigration

Study Finds Growing Racial Divide Among Young People on Immigration

On the whole, young people — particularly young people of color — are supportive of comphrensive immigration reform, according to a new study from the Chicago-based Black Youth Project. But while young people of color were generally supportive of immigration reform, they often had varying ideas of how immigration is changing the country’s landscape.

In an online survey that was conducted in both English and Spanish last Spring among 1,500 respondents between the ages of 18 and 29, the possibilities and challenges of building black-brown political alliances were made clear. The study’s key findings include:

  • Young people of color support a comprehensive approach to immigration reform at higher rates than white youth, who are more supportive of punitive measures and increased enforcement of existing law.
  • Majorities of both Black and white youth believe that undocumented immigrants take away jobs, housing, and health care from people born in the U.S.
  • However, Black (43.3 percent) and white (17.6 percent) youth disagree substantially about whether undocumented immigrants should be eligible for government services.
  • Black youth have a more inclusive and expansive view than white youth of the role of immigrants in American society.
  • A clear majority (61.1 percent) of Black youth believe that immigrants are treated better than most Black people born in this country. These feelings of alienation may inhibit the prospects for Black-Brown coalition-building.

Importantly, those sentiments seem to have shifted over the course of President Obama’s time in the White House. In early 2009, slightly more than 54 percent of black youth between the ages of 18 and 29 believed that immigrants were treated better than most black people who were born in this country. That number has jumped to 61 percent in 2013, according to the survey.

“These findings have substantial implications not only for politics of immigration  reform, but also for the political cohesion of young Blacks and Latinos,” the survey’s authors write. “The findings in this report suggest that there are a variety of attitudinal barriers to Black-Brown collaboration. In an era where young people are deeply worried about the availability of jobs and affordable health care, it is important to limit the ability of the media and our politicians to exploit these concerns and generate mistrust and anxiety among young people of color.”

Visit the Black Youth Project for more information on the survey, titled “Immigration Reform and the Possibility of Black-Brown Coalitions Among America’s Youth.

High Unemployment Rates Aren’t Budging

High Unemployment Rates Aren't Budging

Today’s jobs report underscores the weak state of the U.S. economy as the country considers military action abroad. In August the U.S. added 169,000 jobs. That’s below analysts’ expectations. The overall unemployment rate barely declined to 7.3 percent from 7.4 percent.

Black and Latino unemployment remained virtually unchanged in depression-like territory at 13 percent and over 9 percent respectively. This minuscule decrease in joblessness registered for all the wrong reasons. 

The bottom line is that millions of people have dropped out of the workforce. The decline in those actively looking for work—officially known as the “labor participation rate”—is masking true unemployment.  The number of people who’ve stopped searching is the highest in almost four decades. As the official unemployment number only measures those “actively” looking for work, the exit of millions from the job force makes the overall jobless situation look better than is actually the case. In fact, if discouraged workers were added to unemployment calculations, then the number of those out of work would be closer to 10 percent. 

Adding to the less than stellar report is that it revised downward the number of official jobs created in June and July. There were 74,000 fewer hirings made during that time frame than were initially reported. Given today’s news—with looming critical deadlines in the next four weeks on the budget, debt, health care, and immigration—those concerned about economic justice can only hope that these issues receive top billing alongside the war resolution that’s currently up for consideration.

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