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NOW IN RACIAL JUSTICE

Watch an NYPD Officer Speak Out Against Stop-and-Frisk

Watch an NYPD Officer Speak Out Against Stop-and-Frisk

NYPD officer Adhyl Polanco has made a name for himself as one of the few police officers brave enough to publicly come out against the department’s Stop-and-Frisk policy. In this video, Polanco talks in detail about what drove his opposition.

(h/t Where I Am Going)

New Web Series Explores Latinos in the Bronx

New Web Series Explores Latinos in the Bronx

It seems every week a new web series comes out, a format that seems to be growing in popularity and leading to successful projects like Issa Rae’s breakout “Awkward Black Girl,” the Bushwick, Brooklyn dramedy “East Willy B,” and the wildly funny “Ask a Slave.”  The upsurge in new web-based programs, particularly those being produced by people of color, even inspired an event called Black, Brown and Digital this spring.  

Last month producer Adel L. Morales launched “Pushing Dreams,” a web series that follows a group of interconnected Latinos in the Bronx dealing with unemployment, racism, alcoholism, relationships and other issues. Characters include a Latina lesbian couple—one of whom just lost her job and the other who has served time in prison, and the cast includes Selenis Leyva—who plays Gloria on “Orange is the New Black.” The fourth episode of the series was released yesterday, and follows the gritty day-to-day of people struggling to make ends meet. 

Campaign Aims to End High Rates for Prison Phone Calls

Campaign Aims to End High Rates for Prison Phone Calls

Earlier this year the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ruled in favor of lowering collect call rates for prison inmates, and capping the cost of calls at 25 cents per minute. In some states a phone call can cost as much as $1.13 per minute, which often puts a financial strain on inmates’ families trying to remain in contact with their loved ones. 

The ACLU, Beyond Bars and The Nation* launched a new campaign last week aimed at putting pressure on Global-Tel-Link, one of two large companies that control 80 percent of the prison collect call industry.  The FCC’s ruling is expected to take effect 120 days after the August 9 ruling, but phone company executives have already challenged the decision.

In their campaign video, 9-year-old Kenny Davis from Nashville, Tennessee talks about how he misses his dad, who’s currently incarcerated, and wishes he could talk to him every week. His mother, LaTonya Davis, says they can’t make the four-hour commute very often, and the phone calls are too expensive for her as a single parent.

*Post has been updated since publication

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New Report Illustrates Obstacles for Transgender Immigrants

New Report Illustrates Obstacles for Transgender Immigrants

The National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE) is making it clear how important comprehensive immigration reform is for undocumented transgender people in particular. Although the government shutdown continues, House Democrats revealed a bill last week that they hope to get through a vote this legislative term—and NCTE is now backing it. 

A new NCTE report, meanwhile, highlights four particular challenges that face transgender immigrants:

Employment insecurity: A survey found nearly 40 percent of undocumented transgender people lost jobs because of bias—compared to just 36 percent of U.S. citizens.

Income and housing insecurity: Employment obstacles already make it harder for undocumented transgender folks to establish economic security. But did you know that undocumented transgender people are way more likely to live on less than $10,000 when compared to other populations, including transgender U.S. citizens?

Healthcare challenges: Undocumented transgender people are twice as likely to be physically assaulted in a medical setting, NTCE found.

Creating a pathway to citizenship: There are an estimated 20,000 to 50,000 undocumented transgender people in the U.S. A pathway to citizenship would mean shedding the fear of being separated from loved ones by detention and deportation.

The report, which you can read in its entirety, concludes with a call to Congress to enact a comprehensive immigration reform bill. 

‘Bet on Black’ Challenges Stereotypes of Black Fatherhood

'Bet on Black' Challenges Stereotypes of Black Fatherhood

Between the oft cited statistic that shows two out of three black children living apart from their fathers, and the often oversimplified media portraits of black dads who “walk away” from their children, the most common image of black fatherhood is that of absence. 

In the upcoming anthology “Bet on Black: African-American Women Celebrate Fatherhood in the Age of Barack Obama,” 20 writers reflect on dads who editor Kenrya Rankin Naasel describes as “black men who are committed, integral parts of their families.” 

“As a woman who was raised by a single black dad who made it his obsessive duty to help his daughters flourish, I think it’s key to tell the rest of the story,” says Rankin Naasel. “I don’t deny that there are some dismal statistics out there about single-parent households and stories for days about Black mothers holding it down alone, but I know firsthand that the stereotype doesn’t tell the entire story. Beyond what others think of our families, I feel it’s more important that we see them as strong, cohesive units, worthy of our energy and our protection.”

The independently published anthology, which features essays by writers such as Karen Good Marable, Harriette Cole and Yannick Rice Lamb, will be available on Amazon.com on Friday, October 11. In the run-up to the release, Rankin has a Kickstarter campaign up to increase the number of books available in the first print run.

“My hope is that this book will not only change the conversation that surrounds our men to a positive one, but inspire men who are perhaps falling short to be better,” says Rankin Naasel. “You can only hear that you’re a dog but so many times before you start barking.”

Here’s How You Can Dress Your Child Up Like a Famous Artist This Halloween

Here's How You Can Dress Your Child Up Like a Famous Artist This Halloween

Dear parents, 

Still looking for Halloween ideas for the kids? Look no further. Here’s how you can dress your adorable child up like a famous artist this year. Why? Well, why not? For instance, check out this Frida Kahlo costume from Oh Happy Day:

Frida Kahlo // We based this costume off one of the beautiful Frida Kahlo’s self portraits. The key to a good Frida costume is the flowers in the hair and the unibrow and moustache.

Materials Needed: Clip on Flowers, Eyeliner Pencil, Earrings, Scarf, and Dress.

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(h/t Oh Happy Day)

This 3-Year-Old Danced to Beyoncé on ‘Ellen’ and Killed It

This 3-Year-Old Danced to Beyoncé on 'Ellen' and Killed It

Meet Heaven, a 3-year-old who first caught the Internet’s attention when a video of her dancing a choreographed routine with her mom (who, of course, is a dancer) popped up last spring. Heaven and her mom recently made an appearance on “Ellen” and the little showstopper wasn’t shy at all. When asked if she wants to be a dancer when she grows up, Heaven replied, “I am a dancer!”

TAGS: Beyonce

Stic of Dead Prez Shares Seven Easy Tips for Eating Well on a ‘Hood Budget

Stic of Dead Prez Shares Seven Easy Tips for Eating Well on a 'Hood Budget

For Stic of hip-hop group dead prez, healthy eating is a revolutionary act. That’s why he’s made his lifestyle of good food and plentiful exercise an important facet of his public persona over the past several years. Black communities are besiged by high rates of obesity, high cholesterol, and heart disease and too many lack even basic access to affordable, healthy foods. Recently, the rapper offered up some easy ways to eat well without spending too much money.

“I have run into the following sentiment more than a few times: ‘I want to eat healthier but it’s too expensive!,” Stic wrote for plantbasedonabudget.com. “But bottom line always remember, we can pay now or pay later (in suffering and doctor bills etc.) when it comes to our dietary discipline and choices.” Here are a few of his tips:

Choose Produce not Packages: People think eating healthy is about buying a lot of expensive boxes and packages of processed foods, but that isn’t the case at all.

Cook Big and Save Some for Later: Cooking meals in large batches and freezing the leftovers for later in the week or month can save you a lot of time and money.

Instead of buying fast food or eating out at restaurants, or even cooking a full meal every time you get hungry, it’s way more cost effective and time saving and healthy for you to pull something out of the freezer and warm it up than it is to wash/chop/slice/boil/bake/wait in line/wait to be served etc. Them big Ziploc bags ain’t just for the D-boys! Lol

Soup Up your Options:  Large vegetable soups over brown rice or whole grain noodles pack in vitamins and nutrients, fill you up and are easy to make and delicious. Also Bean burritos, chili, and bean soup can be easy to prepare, cheap and good for you. Going totally meatless a couple of times a week (or for good) also helps your budget and gives your palate a variety to enjoy. Frozen veggies, which are inexpensive, work great in Soups. Nothing compares to that good and filling, good feeling of a hot and hearty bowl of Soup. Cheap, packed with nutrients, easy to prepare. Its the new “Soup-er” food! Lol!

Read the rest of Stic’s seven tips for eating well on a ‘hood budget at plantbasedonabudget.com.

Shutdown Week Two: Defense Dept. Puts 350,000 Back to Work

Shutdown Week Two: Defense Dept. Puts 350,000 Back to Work

Due to a recall over the weekend of 350,000 workers, the total number of federal employees furloughed was cut in half. The move was made by the Defense Department on Saturday to bring back almost all of its workers on the same day that the United States mounted military operations in Somalia and Libya. Though the summons to return to work was welcome news for hundreds of thousands of families, over a million more still remain in a lurch.

Despite the decrease in the number of furloughed workers to 450,000, more than one million more still on the job are not receiving pay.  As the shutdown stretches into its second week, concern and anxiety over how they’re going to make it is rising amongst many. CNBC reports that federal employees are increasingly turning to sites like eBay and Craigslist to sell items and raise badly needed cash. Others are selling their labor.

Temporary work site Task Rabbit has seen the number of people who’ve registered for jobs reach an all-time high since the shutdown. The number of those offering their services on Task Rabbit has doubled since October 1. With the normal payday for many federal employees scheduled for this week, pressure to figure out new ways to make ends meet will only grow.

Although the Defense Department is mostly back, agencies focused on education, the environment and health remain mostly closed. As a federal employee told me over the weekend, “everybody working is only thinking about what we’re going to do for our kids.”

Feminist Bookstore in Atlanta Vandalized with Homophobic Graffiti

Feminist Bookstore in Atlanta Vandalized with Homophobic Graffiti

Charis Books and More, one of the oldest feminist bookstores in the country, was vandalized with anti-gay graffiti last Thursday* following a “Stride for Pride” event as part of Atlanta’s gay pride week. Other stores in the area were also vandalized, but Charis was spray-painted with explicit homophobic words and vulgar imagery. Volunteers came out to help repaint the store, and called on others to make donations or purchases in order to help the store cover the costs.

Founded in 1974, Charis has served as an important social and cultural space in the Atlanta, carrying a wide variety of literature written by and about feminists, women of color, and LGBTQ people. They’ve also been a space for addressing broader social justice issues faced by the local community, and recently signed on to become a part of Freedom University, which helps give undocumented students access to college-level classes by donating books.

*Post has been corrected. Stride for Pride was on Thursday, not Saturday. 

Actress Lupita Nyong’o Talks Preparing for Violence in Film ‘12 Years a Slave’

Actress Lupita Nyong'o Talks Preparing for Violence in Film '12 Years a Slave'

Steven McQueen’s highly anticipated slave-themed drama “12 Years a Slave” makes its United States debut on October 18, but the film has already become to the talk of the industry for its unbridled approach toward capturing the brutality of slavery. At a recent screening at the Toronto Film Festival, some movie-goers walked out of the theater because they couldn’t stand the film’s brutality.

The film stars Chitwetel Ejiofor as Solomon Northup, a black man who was born free in New York but was captured and sold into slavery. Newcomer actress Lupita Nyong’o, who recently won the New Hollywood Award, takes up a prominent role in the film and is a central character in one of its most brutal scenes, in which Solomon is forced to whip another slave on the plantation. 

Nyong’o talked to Shadow & Act’s Jai Tiggett about her role in the film. 

S&A: The most painful and memorable scene to watch is that in which Epps asks Solomon (Chiwetel Ejiofor) to whip your character, and as he starts to do that, Epps takes over because he doesn’t like Solomon’s effort. McQueen doesn’t show the violence, but rather suggests it through your character. It’s not only emotionally stirring, but McQueen makes us watch for what seems like an eternity, which makes it even more uncomfortable. Tell me about filming that scene. 

LN: All throughout filming 12 Years a Slave, there was a focus like no other. Everyone took ownership of this film and gave their all. So there was always a reverence, a vibration on set, as Michael [Fassbender] says a lot. It was like a sound that you could hear, a focus. And on that particular day I remember getting on set and feeling like I was covered. Everyone knew that this was going to be a hard day, not just for me, but for everyone involved. And we just went about getting it done. In the autobiography, Solomon [Northup] describes that day as the “darkest day of all time.” But I felt safe going to that depth of despair in that environment. And I also felt the humiliation quite similar to what Patsey must have felt, though obviously hers was much worse. 

You can read the rest of the interview over at Shadow & Act.

Nyong’o sat down with another one of the film’s stars, Alfre Woodard, to talk more about its upcoming release.

Chris Brown Says He Lost His Virginity at Eight Years Old

Chris Brown Says He Lost His Virginity at Eight Years Old

In an interview with The Guardian, singer Chris Brown opened up about his sexual history, admitting that he “lost his virginity” when he was just eight-years-old. From the Guardian:

He grins and chuckles. “It’s different in the country.” Brown grew up with a great gang of boy cousins, and they watched so much porn that he was raring to go. “By that point, we were already kind of like hot to trot, you know what I’m saying? Like, girls, we weren’t afraid to talk to them; I wasn’t afraid. So, at eight, being able to do it, it kind of preps you for the long run, so you can be a beast at it. You can be the best at it.” (Now 24, he doesn’t want to say how many women he’s slept with: “But you know how Prince had a lot of girls back in the day? Prince was, like, the guy. I’m just that, today. But most women won’t have any complaints if they’ve been with me. They can’t really complain. It’s all good.”)

Rapper Lil’ Wayne made a similar admission back in 2009, when he told a reporter that he lost his virginity at 11 to a girl who was 13. Both men recount their first sexual experiences as evidence of their budding sexual prowess and not something along the lines of assault, which isn’t unique since it’s a lot harder for men to admit that they’ve been sexually assaulted.

Brown Signs Bills Increasing Protections for California Immigrants

Brown Signs Bills Increasing Protections for California Immigrants

On Saturday, amid a nationwide day of action for immigration reform, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed eight bills that ease conditions for undocumented immigrants in the state. Among them was the “TRUST Act,” which prevents law enforcement from unduly detaining undocumented immigrants who have not committed serious crimes. He also approved a measure last week that would give undocumented immigrants the right to apply for drivers licenses.

Other bills singed include one that allows undocumented immigrants to be admitted to the California Bar Association, and another allowing community colleges to exempt undocumented students from being charged non-resident tuition if they are attending part-time. It seems the government shutdown and continued Congressional inaction on immigration reform did not deter Brown from making landmark decisions on immigrant rights in his own state.

Thousands of People Marched for Immigration Reform This Weekend

Thousands of People Marched for Immigration Reform This Weekend

This past weekend thousands of people in cities across the country marched for immigration reform. The actions were part of a “National Day of Immigrant Dignity and Respect” and organizers estimated that 50,000 people turned out nationwide. In total, rallies took place at more than 150 sites in 40 cities in an effort to pressure Congress to act on an immigration reform bill before the end of the year. Here’s a look at the action that took place in three cities.

Los Angeles:

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Photo credit: John Moore/ Getty Images.

New York:

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Photo credit: Kena Betancur/ Getty Images.

New Haven, CT:

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Photo credit: Spencer Platt/ Getty Images.

Watch Fannie Lou Hamer’s Testimony at the 1964 Democratic National Covention

Watch Fannie Lou Hamer's Testimony at the 1964 Democratic National Covention

Sunday was Fannie Lou Hamer’s birthday, so it’s worth taking a look back at the impact that the famed Civil Rights activist had on American history. Here’s video of Hamer’s testimony at the Democratic National Convention on August 22, 1964 in Atlantic City.

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Immigration Marches Planned in 150 Cities for Saturday

Immigration Marches Planned in 150 Cities for Saturday

As the Obama administration remains on track to deport its two millionth immigrant, people are once again taking to the streets this Saturday in hope of a comprehensive immigration reform bill. House Democrats unveiled a bill this week. Representative Luis Gutierrez has since made clear that the bill could pass the House with bipartisan support. Getting as far as a vote is unlikely, however, during the government shutdown.

People in more than 100 cities around the country are preparing for marches to demand Congress move forward on a bill. Dubbed the March for Immigrant Dignity and Respect, the event is largely organized by unions and mainstream immigrant rights organizations. Activists and advocates at Saturday’s events hope to give the House one last push for immigration reform. Another march is planned for October 8 in Washington, DC

Ex-Marine Calls on People of Color to Back Same-Sex Marriage

Ex-Marine Calls on People of Color to Back Same-Sex Marriage

In 2006 Marquell Smith was discharged from the military due to Don’t Ask Don’t Tell (DADT), and his experiences inspired him to work toward repealing the policy that prevented LGBTQ people in the military to serve openly.  DADT was repealed in 2010, and since then Smith has turned his attention to getting people of color to back same-sex marriage.  

This week, Smith launched the Inclusive Community Project, a political action comittee that aims to get people of color to support LGBT causes. He’s beginning his nationwide campaign in his home state of Illinois, where a judge recently ruled to allow two lawsuits challenging the state’s ban on gay marriage to move forward. 

At a fundraiser on Thursday, he said that he was struck by the lack of diversity among people advocating for same-sex marriage in Illinois, and decided to do something about it. 

“I was getting a feeling that there weren’t a lot of people standing up who looked like me. The whole idea behind this is to get citizens to really stand up and get people of color to get behind [same-sex] marriage.”

Smith also said he believes there’s broad support in the black community for same-sex marriage, and he’s making it his mission to mobilize them behind this and other causes that affect LGBTQ people. 

Watch Smith share his story for the It Gets Better Project.  

(h/t Chicago Sun-Times)

Herman Wallace Dies Three Days After Being Released From Solitary

Herman Wallace Dies Three Days After Being Released From Solitary

After an unprecedented release from solitary confinement on Tuesday, Herman Wallace died today at age 71. Wallace had spent more than 40 years in solitary, and was taken into hospice to be treated for terminal liver cancer immediately after his release.

As Colorlines reported earlier this week, Federal Judge Brian A. Jackson gave the order to have Wallace immediately released because women were excluded from his grand jury. Despite the judge’s ruling, on Thursday he was re-indicted by a West Feliciana Parish grand jury who insisted he was not innocent. 

In 1972 Wallace, along with fellow Black Panther Party members Robert Hillary King and Albert Woodfox, was put in solitary confinement after being convicted of fatally stabbing a prison guard at Louisiana’s Angola Prison. They came to be known as the Angola 3, and they maintained their innocence in the guard’s death. They insisted that they had been targeted for establishing a prison chapter of the Black Panther Party in 1971. Wallace was initially imprisoned on robbery charges.

On Tuesday night Wallace was met by supporters and loved ones, including Robert King—who had been the only member of the Angola 3 to be release from prison—and artist Jackie Sumell, with whom he worked on an art project where he imagined his dream house. He would have turned 72 on October 13. 

The Awful Reality Faced By Teens Who Are Locked Away in Solitary Confinement

The Awful Reality Faced By Teens Who Are Locked Away in Solitary Confinement

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) just released a new video to draw attention to the problem of juvenile prisoners being held in solitary confinement. The video comes amid a multi-year campaign waged by the organization to end the practice of placing youth offenders, many of whom are charged with adult crimes and housed in adult facilities, in solitary confinement for up to 22-24 hours each day

The video, like the problem itself, is hard to watch, but difficult to ignore, according to the group.

It’s a problem that’s especially prevalent for youth of color who are in the country’s jails and prisons. Though overall youth incarceration has decreased in recent years, youth of color are still more likely to end up behind bars than their white counterparts. According to the group, African-American youth in New Jersey are more than 4.5 times more likely to be incarcerated in a state youth prison. And in South Dakota, Native American youth make up more than 40 percent of the state’s incarcerated youth, but just 13 percent of the overall population.

Lauryn Hill Marks Release From Prison With New Track ‘Consumerism’

Lauryn Hill Marks Release From Prison With New Track 'Consumerism'

Lauryn Hill is scheduled to be released from federal prison today after serving a three-month sentence for tax evasion. The former Fugees singer has marked the occasion with the release of a new track called “Consumerism.” The track is a seething indictment of all of the world’s -‘isms, about which Hill wrote:

“Consumerism is part of some material I was trying to finish before I had to come in. We did our best to eek out a mix via verbal and emailed direction, thanks to the crew of surrogate ears on the other side. Letters From Exile is material written from a certain space, in a certain place. I felt the need to discuss the underlying socio-political, cultural paradigm as I saw it. I haven’t been able to watch the news too much recently, so I’m not hip on everything going on. But inspiration of this sort is a kind of news in and of itself, and often times contains an urgency that precedes what happens. I couldn’t imagine it not being relevant. Messages like these I imagine find their audience, or their audience finds them, like water seeking it’s level.”


- Ms. Lauryn Hill

(h/t Okayplayer)

TAGS: Lauryn Hill
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