Colorlines

History

On Sapelo Island, Another Case Study in How Black Exploitation Fuels Wealth

On Sapelo Island, Another Case Study in How Black Exploitation Fuels Wealth

by Imara Jones on October 1 2012, 9:37AM

From Georgia to Brooklyn to sub-Sahran Africa, inequity and exploitive land deals are making a handful of people rich—again. But on Sapelo Island, we can stop it.

Topics: Economic Justice, History, Sapelo Island

Statue Honoring KKK Grand Wizard Planned on Alabama Public Land

Statue Honoring KKK Grand Wizard Planned on Alabama Public Land

by Jorge Rivas on September 12 2012, 5:50PM

Renovations on an Alabama monument honoring the Ku Klux Klan’s founder has sparked outrage from critics who are pushing to stop the expansion.

Topics: History, /NOW

Richard Aoki Documentary Directors Blast FBI Allegations

Richard Aoki Documentary Directors Blast FBI Allegations

by Jamilah King on August 22 2012, 11:05AM

The statement calls for Aoki’s supporters to conduct their own research.

Topics: History, National Security, /NOW, Richard Aoki

Richard Aoki, the FBI, and the Long (Ongoing) Saga of State Spying

Richard Aoki, the FBI, and the Long (Ongoing) Saga of State Spying

by Jamilah King on August 21 2012, 9:24AM

A damning new report alleges that the late Black Panther Richard Aoki may have worked as an FBI informant. But is state intervention in progressive movements inevitable?

Topics: History, National Security, Richard Aoki

Texas' Road To Victory in Its Decades Long Fight Against Voting Rights

Texas’ Road To Victory in Its Decades Long Fight Against Voting Rights

by Brentin Mock on July 12 2012, 10:14AM

In 1944, a landmark Supreme Court decision over Texas’ Jim Crow laws changed the arc of voting history. This week, the case that’s expected to change things again began its trip to the Roberts court.

Topics: Voting Rights, History, Politics

Texas vs. Voting Rights, 1944 to 2012 [Infographic] Infographic

Texas vs. Voting Rights, 1944 to 2012 [Infographic]

by Hatty Lee on July 12 2012, 10:11AM

The state’s current challenge to the Voting Rights Act isn’t new. For decades, it’s put up the nation’s most aggressive fight against federal authority to protect voters of color.

Topics: Voting Rights, History, Politics

The Civil Rights Act Celebrates 48th Anniversary

The Civil Rights Act Celebrates 48th Anniversary

by Jorge Rivas on July 3 2012, 5:13PM

Signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 2, 1964, the landmark Civil Rights Act outlawed discrimination and segregation regardless of race or color.

Topics: History, /NOW

Southern Baptists Poised to Elect First Black President

by Jorge Rivas on June 19 2012, 1:19PM

The Southern Baptist Convention is expected to elect its first black president at its annual meeting on Tuesday

Topics: History, /NOW

Two Decades Later, Children of the L.A. Riots Share Memories Play

Two Decades Later, Children of the L.A. Riots Share Memories

by Jorge Rivas on April 30 2012, 9:48AM

Watch a series of video portraits of young adults who were 8, 9 and 10-year olds during the LA Riots.

Topics: 1992 L.A. Riots, History

Understanding Hipster Racism: Lester Bangs' 1979

Understanding Hipster Racism: Lester Bangs’ 1979 “White Noise Supremacists”

by Channing Kennedy on April 27 2012, 4:30PM

The late rock critic took his scene, and himself, to task for “racist chic” back in 1979. His message and analysis is sadly relevant today.

Topics: Arts & Culture, History

An Interactive Look at the Heavy Price of American Freedom

An Interactive Look at the Heavy Price of American Freedom

by Jamilah King on April 25 2012, 8:55AM

An ambitious new timeline traces the brutal relationship between freedom and confinement in the United States.

Topics: Criminal Justice, History, July 4th

Asians Were Fastest-Growing U.S. Population in Last Decade, Census Finds‎

by Jorge Rivas on March 22 2012, 1:42PM

According to the 2010 Census, the Asian population grew faster than any other race group in the United States between 2000 and 2010.

Topics: History, /NOW, Politics

Trayvon Martin and the Deadly Legacy of Vigilantism

Trayvon Martin and the Deadly Legacy of Vigilantism

by Jamilah King on March 20 2012, 10:33AM

A historian’s new look at the legacy of lynching, and its enduring relevance today.

Topics: Criminal Justice, History, Trayvon Martin

End Black History Month? Q&A with Filmmaker Shukree Hassan Tilghman

End Black History Month? Q&A with Filmmaker Shukree Hassan Tilghman

by Channing Kennedy on February 29 2012, 9:39AM

In a new PBS documentary, a young black filmmaker decides Black History Month has outlasted its purpose, and tries to be proven wrong.

Topics: Arts & Culture, History

Junot Díaz to Publish New Book One Month Ahead of Keynote at Facing Race

by Jorge Rivas on February 28 2012, 3:48PM

Junot Díaz, the Dominican-American, Pulitzer Prize winning Fiction author is releasing a new collection of short stories in September.

Topics: History, /NOW

L.A. County: Sorry for Tens of Thousands of Deportations in Depression

L.A. County: Sorry for Tens of Thousands of Deportations in Depression

by Jorge Rivas on February 22 2012, 8:38AM

L.A. County Board of Supervisors formally apologized for deporting “tens of thousands of Mexicans and Mexican Americans living in L.A. County” during the Depression because they were supposedly taking jobs from white U.S. born citizens.

Topics: History, /NOW

The Asian American Basketball Leagues That Helped Create Linsanity

The Asian American Basketball Leagues That Helped Create Linsanity

by Jamilah King on February 21 2012, 9:57AM

It’s estimated that in Southern California alone, there are 14,000 Japanese Americans who play in regular club tournaments. Some teams have been around for more than 50 years.

Topics: Arts & Culture, History, Jeremy Lin

What America Hasn't Learned 70 Years After Japanese Internment

What America Hasn’t Learned 70 Years After Japanese Internment

by Julianne Hing, Hatty Lee on February 17 2012, 9:00AM

Sunday, Feb. 19, marked the 70th anniversary of President Franklin Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066, which led to the forced internment of more than 120,000 Japanese-Americans.

Topics: History

Activist Patricia Stephens Due Dead at 72

Activist Patricia Stephens Due Dead at 72

by Jorge Rivas on February 8 2012, 4:59PM

The 72-year-old, whom they called the Joan of Arc of the civil rights movement in Tallahassee, Fla., succumbed on Tuesday after a long fight with thyroid cancer.

Topics: History, /NOW

'Little Known Black History Facts' Talks Outside the Family. So What?

‘Little Known Black History Facts’ Talks Outside the Family. So What?

by Channing Kennedy on February 6 2012, 9:30AM

“It’s not in my job description as a black woman to never laugh about my history,” says Tracy Clayton, the humorist behind the Tumblr.

Topics: Arts & Culture, History