Edwidge Danticat recently sat down to talk with Guernica Magazine about her new novel, “Claire of the Sea Light.” It’s Danticat’s first novel in more than a decade, and the first book she’s published since Haiti’s devestating 2010 earthquake. It’s a fascinating interview that touhces on everything from Danticat’s own creative process to how immigrant writers are categorized by publishers and Wikipedia. Here’s one part that really stood out:

Guernica: Would these be very different stories if you didn’t translate? If you took them down in Creole?

Edwidge Danticat: Oh, definitely. I had that experience with Krik? Krak! I made some of the stories into radio plays in Creole and they become totally different. More alive in some way. More immediate. In the epigraph to Drown, Junot Diaz uses a quote from a Cuban poet, Gustavo Pérez Firmat—“The fact that I am writing to you in English already falsifies what I wanted to tell you.” This is the dilemma of the immigrant writer. If I’d lived in Haiti my whole life, I’d be writing these things in Creole. But these stories I am writing now are coming through me as a person who, though I travel to Haiti often, has lived in the U.S. for more than three decades now.

Often when you’re an immigrant writing in English, people think it’s primarily a commercial choice. But for many of us, it’s a choice that rises out of the circumstances of our lives. These are the tools I have at my disposal, based on my experiences. It’s a constant debate, not just in my community but in other communities as well. Where do you belong? You’re kind of one of us, but you now write in a different language. You’re told you don’t belong to American literature or you’re told you don’t belong to Haitian literature. Maybe there’s a place on the hyphen, as Julia Alvarez so brilliantly wrote in one of her essays. That middle generation, the people whose parents brought them to other countries as small children, or even people who were born to immigrant parents, maybe they can have their own literature too.

Read the rest over at Guernica.



Read this online at http://colorlines.com/archives/2013/09/edwidge_danticat_on_the_dilemma_of_the_immigrant_writer.html


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