Chicago leads the nation in murders and young people under 25 are often the ones who die. Last year the windy city experienced 100 more murders than New York City, even though NYC has three times as many residents.

The Chicago Reporter, a publication that has been investigating race and poverty since 1972, just published an investigation that looks at the 21 leading communities for youth homicides in the city.

Here’s a snapshot of The Chicago Reporter’s findings:

The city’s 21 leading communities for youth homicides, all majority-black or majority-Latino communities on the city’s South, Southwest and West sides, account for just 32 percent of the city’s residents. But they also account for:

  • More than 73 percent of the city’s 1,118 homicide victims under the age of 25 from 2008 through 2012

  • Almost 70 percent of Chicago’s population loss between 2000 and 2010. Those 21 communities collectively lost 140,000 residents during that time. The city as a whole lost 200,000 residents

  • More than 53 percent of the locations of Chicago public school closings announced since 2001

  • Nearly 43 percent of Chicago’s 109,000 foreclosure filings from January 2007 through June 2012

  • More than 71 percent of the city’s 138 public elementary schools that were low-performing in math [“Low-performing” is defined as schools where fewer than 10 percent of students’ standardized test scores exceeded state standards during the 2011-2012 school year]

  • Nearly 68 percent of the 221 Chicago public elementary schools that were low-performing in reading

  • Nearly 59 percent of the 46 public high schools whose average 11th grade ACT composite scores were below 16

  • More than 56 percent of the city’s more than 72,296 teen births from 1999 through 2009

Visit the Chicago Reporter’s website to read the full story: “Youths are the No. 1 target in Chicago’s homicide epidemic.”

Read this online at http://colorlines.com/archives/2013/01/chicago_leads_nation_in_murders_with_young_people_under_25_dying_most_often.html


Thank you for printing out this Colorlines.com article. If you liked this article, please make a donation today at colorlines.com/donate to support our ongoing news coverage, investigations and actions to promote solutions.