Sixty-five percent of the Nation’s 50.7 million Latinos self-identify as being of Mexican origin, according to tabulations of the 2010 American Community Survey (ACS) released Wednesday by the Pew Hispanic Center. No other Latino subgroup rivals the size of the Mexican-origin population, according to the report. Puerto Ricans, the nation’s second largest Hispanic origin group, make up just 9% of the total Hispanic population in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Salvadorans, Dominicans, Guatemalans, Colombians, Hondurans, Ecuadorians and Peruvians make up 92% of the U.S. Latino population.

2012-phc-summary-01a.png

More from Pew’s report:

Hispanic origin groups differ from each other in a number of ways. For instance, U.S. Hispanics of Mexican origin have the lowest median age, at 25 years, while Hispanics of Cuban origin have the highest median age, at 40 years. Colombians are the most likely to have a college degree (32%) while Salvadorans are the least likely (7%). Ecuadorians have the highest annual median household income ($50,000) while Dominicans have the lowest ($34,000). Half of Hondurans do not have health insurance——the highest share among Hispanic origin groups. By contrast, just 15% of Puerto Ricans do not have health insurance.

Hispanic origin groups also differ in their geographic concentration. The nation’s Cuban population is the most concentrated——nearly half (48%) live in Florida’s Miami-Dade County. Miami-Dade County is also home to the nation’s largest Colombian, Honduran and Peruvian communities. For Mexicans, Salvadorans and Guatemalans, Los Angeles County in California contains each group’s largest community. The largest Puerto Rican and Dominican communities are in Bronx County, New York. The largest Ecuadorian community is in Queens County, New York.

Hispanic origin is based on self-described family ancestry or place of birth in response to questions in the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. It is not necessarily the same as place of birth, nor is it indicative of immigrant or citizenship status. For example, a U.S. citizen born in Los Angeles of Mexican immigrant parents or grandparents may (or may not) identify his or her country of origin as Mexico. Likewise, some immigrants born in Mexico may identify another country as their origin depending on the place of birth of their ancestors.

The report also looked at the top regions for Latinos in the U.S: 2012-phc-summary-02.png

Hispanic subgroups also differ in their states, regions and counties of geographic concentration. Mexicans, Salvadorans and Guatemalans are largely concentrated in western states, while Cubans, Colombians, Hondurans and Peruvians are largely concentrated in the South. The largest numbers of Puerto Ricans, Dominicans and Ecuadorians are in the Northeast.

The nation’s Cuban population is the most concentrated. Nearly half (48%) live in one county—Miami-Dade County in Florida. Miami-Dade County is also home to the nation’s largest Colombian, Honduran and Peruvian communities.

For Mexicans, Salvadorans and Guatemalans, Los Angeles County in California contains each group’s largest community. Los Angeles County alone contains 9% of the nation’s Hispanic population. Bronx County in New York contains the largest Puerto Rican and Dominican populations. And Queens County in New York contains the largest Ecuadorian population.

The report, “The 10 Largest Hispanic Origin Groups: Characteristics, Rankings, Top Counties,” is available at the Pew Hispanic Center’s website, www.pewhispanic.org.

TAGS: Census Latinos

Read this online at http://colorlines.com/archives/2012/06/pew_study_65_of_latinos_in_the_us_self-identify_as_being_of_mexican_origin.html


Thank you for printing out this Colorlines.com article. If you liked this article, please make a donation today at colorlines.com/donate to support our ongoing news coverage, investigations and actions to promote solutions.