It should make perfect sense. During a highly contentious election year in which Democrats are already predicted to lose badly, it seems like smart politics to reach out to one of the party’s emerging voting blocs. Voters under the age of 30 came out in high numbers in 2006 to help Democrats win a majority on Capitol Hill. And even higher numbers in 2008 to help elect the nation’s first black president. And those numbers include non-college and youth of color.

So Campus Progress released this video recently as part of a national Vote Again 2010 video contest to encourage young voters to keep going to the polls. Young folks actually like politics, when they’re made relevant to them. Unfortunately, some young folks also like Justin Bieber. So a hilarious video that makes an appeal to young voters while poking fun at a teen idol shouldn’t be surprising:

But a lot of folks didn’t think it was funny. The video got a lot of buzz, and was featured everywhere from Vanity Fair to Politico. The Washington Post called it the “worst political ad ever.” CNN got involved. Even an appeal by Van Jones on why young voters were so important couldn’t calm down Beibergate:

Despite the controversy, the folks at Campus Progress haven’t lost sight of the larger picture:

The point is this. While our Bieber video was satirical, the underlying message is no laughing matter. While members of Congress may have the power to vote for or against legislation, we have the power to vote for or against every one of them. There’s a lot at stake this November 2nd whether you’re voting for Bieber, energy reform, immigration reform, LGBT equality, or job creation. Election Day is our day, and it gives us an opportunity to make ourselves heard and have the last laugh.

Can’t argue with that.

Read this online at http://colorlines.com/archives/2010/09/why_is_everyone_so_confused_about_campus_progresss_appeal_to_young_voters.html


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